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Anatomy
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Slide 54

thin, transparent mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the lids (the palpebral conjunctiva) and the anterior surface of the sclera (the bulbar conjunctiva).

thin, transparent mucous membrane that covers the posterior surface of the lids (the palpebral conjunctiva) and the anterior surface of the sclera (the bulbar conjunctiva).

Slide 55

The palpebral conjunctiva lines the posterior surface of the lids and is firmly adherent to the tarsus.

The palpebral conjunctiva lines the posterior surface of the lids and is firmly adherent to the tarsus.

Except at the limbus (where Tenon's capsule and the conjunctiva are fused for about 3 mm), the bulbar conjunctiva is loosely attached to Tenon's capsule and the underlying sclera

Slide 56

The accessory lacrimal glands (glands of Krause and Wolfring): in the stroma.

The accessory lacrimal glands (glands of Krause and Wolfring): in the stroma.

Most of the glands of Krause are in the upper fornix.

The glands of Wolfring lie at the superior margin of the upper tarsus.

Slide 57

Blood Supply& Nerve Supply

Blood Supply& Nerve Supply

anterior ciliary and palpebral arteries.

the first (ophthalmic) division of the fifth nerve.

Slide 58

Tenon's Capsule (Fascia Bulbi)

Tenon's Capsule (Fascia Bulbi)

Slide 59

fibrous membrane that envelops the globe from the limbus to the optic nerve. Adjacent to the limbus, the conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and episclera are fused together.

fibrous membrane that envelops the globe from the limbus to the optic nerve. Adjacent to the limbus, the conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and episclera are fused together.

More posteriorly, the inner surface of Tenon's capsule lies against the sclera, and its outer aspect is in contact with orbital fat and other structures within the extraocular muscle cone. At the point where Tenon's capsule is pierced by tendons of the extraocular muscles in their passage to their attachments to the globe, it sends a tubular reflection around each of these muscles. These fascial reflections become continuous with the fascia of the muscles, the fused fasciae sending expansions to the surrounding structures and to the orbital bones. The fascial expansions are quite tough and limit the action of the extraocular muscles and are therefore known as check ligaments. They regulate the direction of action of the extraocular muscles and act as their functional mechanical origins.

The lower segment of Tenon's capsule is thick and fuses with the fascia of the inferior rectus and the inferior oblique muscles to form the suspensory ligament of the eyeball (Lockwood's ligament), upon which the globe rests.

Slide 60

Tenon's Capsule (Fascia Bulbi)

Slide 61

The Sclera & Episclera

The Sclera & Episclera

Slide 62

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